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Zika Prevention

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IMPORTANT INFORMATION ABOUT THE ZIKA VIRUS

BROWARD COUNTY TO CONDUCT AERIAL SPRAYING FOR MOSQUITO LARVAE
The Broward County Mosquito Control Section will be conducting preventive aerial spraying for mosquito larvae. Please visit the Broward County websitehttp://goo.gl/oerMPd for complete scheduling information and maps of the areas that will be affected.

Are neighborhoods in Broward County being sprayed for mosquitos?
Yes. In order to reduce the potential spread of the Zika virus, Broward County's Mosquito Control Section is continuing to limit the mosquito population throughout the county by spraying areas with reported concentrations of mosquitoes, checking known mosquito breeding sites, treating standing water from recent rain events, and spraying in areas requested by citizens. 

Can I request that my neighborhood be sprayed for mosquitos?
Yes. You can contact the Broward County Mosquito Control Section and request spraying in your neighborhood by: 

 

The City of Fort Lauderdale is working closely with the lead authority, the Florida Department of Health, as well as Broward County and other agencies to support mosquito control, education, and prevention efforts related to Zika.

The health and well-being of our neighbors and visitors is our top priority.  As such, we are committed to providing the most accurate and current information as it becomes available.  At this time, the following facts are known:

  • There are no locally acquired cases and no areas of active transmission of Zika virus in Broward County.
  • There are no travel advisories, issued by state, federal or international public health officials, advising people, not to travel to Broward County
  • The majority of Zika cases in South Florida have been travel related cases with individuals that have traveled to countries with active Zika transmission
  • The Broward County Department of Public Works Mosquito Control Section has responded rapidly with mosquito control measures, coordinating aggressive preventative efforts, including:
    • Deploying additional personnel to administer chemical treatments to areas of standing water
    • Conducting door-to-door back pack spraying
    • Draining standing water where possible
    • Eliminating mosquito habitats and setting up mosquito traps
    • Sampling adult mosquitos to gauge effectiveness of the above-mentioned treatments
  • The Florida Department of Health Broward County has been educating residents and business owners how to prevent mosquito breeding sites
  • The Florida Department of Health is issuing updates each weekday at 2:00 p.m. that can be accessed on their website.

CITY OF FORT LAUDERDALE ACTIONS

The City of Fort Lauderdale continues to take proactive steps to help prevent the spread of the Zika virus.

 -A Special Response Team from Code Enforcement and Building Services continues to identify, inspect, cite and address properties with code violations for improper pool maintenance and/or stagnant water. 

-The Special Response Team is working closely with the City’s Unsafe Structures Board to address pools at abandoned and/or vacant properties that meet the criteria to be filled. 

-Fort Lauderdale Public Works crews are proactively canvassing the City with vacuum trucks to clean blocked storm drains and clear areas with standing water in City right-of-ways. 

-The Fort Lauderdale Parks and Recreation Department, which offers the largest after school program in the County, is sending home information on proper mosquito prevention and encouraging parents to make sure their children are using insect repellant. 

-The Emergency Management Bureau recently hosted a Zika Information Presentation at the Mills Pond Park Community Center to educate the public about the Zika Virus and provide the latest updates from the Florida Department of Health. Mosquito prevention kits were distributed to those in attendance. 

-The City has mailed every water utility customer the Florida Department of Health’s two-sided educational flyer aimed at Zika prevention. 

-The City of Fort Lauderdale continues to promote and help disseminate the Florida Department of Health’s Zika prevention messaging via our website, social media sites, electronic newsletter and other communication tools. 

-We encourage all of neighbors and businesses to follow Florida Department of Health guidelines for prevention.  Please dress properly and wear mosquito repellent if you are outside for any activities or events.  And please clear your property of any standing water. 

-If you see a property with improper pool maintenance and/or stagnant water, please report it to the City’s 24-hour Neighbor Call Center at 954-828-8000, online via Lauderserv or by using the Lauderserv app. 

ZIKA QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS

What is Zika?
Zika is a virus that is primarily spread by mosquitoes, though it can also be sexually transmitted. The biggest risk of Zika is to pregnant women or women of childbearing age. Zika virus can cause a serious birth defect called microcephaly, as well as other severe fetal brain defects.

What are the symptoms of Zika?
Zika can cause symptoms including fever, rash, joint pain, or red eyes. An illness from Zika is usually mild, and the symptoms typically will only last several days to a week. Based on previous outbreaks, however, approximately 80 percent of people who have Zika will not have any symptoms.

How many travel related cases of Zika are there?
The Florida Department of Health is tracking the number of travel-related cases of the Zika virus.

How many non-travel related casescases of Zika are there?
The Florida Department of Health is tracking the number of non-travel related cases of the Zika virus.

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Where is the Zika virus being spread?

At this time, the Florida Department of Health believes that non-travel related transmission of the virus is only taking place within two small areas of Miami-Dade County – one in a portion of the Wynwood area located north of downtown Miami and the other in a portion of the southern area of Miami Beach.  

Wynwood Area - NW 22nd St. at the South, NE 2nd Ave to NE 23rd St. at the east; NW 3rd Ave to the west; and NE 36th St to the north.

Miami Beach Area - 28th Street to the north, 8th Street to the south, lntercoastal water to the west and the Atlantic Ocean to the east.

Florida’s small-case cluster is not considered widespread transmission; however, the Florida Department of Health recommends that pregnant women avoid non-essential travel to the two impacted areas in Miami-Dade County. If you are pregnant and must travel or if you live or work in the impacted area, protect yourself from mosquito bites by wearing insect repellent, long clothing and limiting your time outdoors.

Is the Zika virus being spread in Broward County?

No.  Currently, there are no locally acquired cases and no areas of active transmission of the Zika virus in Broward County. 

How Do I Prevent Getting Zika?
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has an extensive website which provides helpful prevention information and specific steps you can take to protect yourself and others. This is particularly important if you travel to an area with active Zika transmission. It is important to remember to follow the guidelines not only when you are in an area with active Zika transmission, but also for three weeks after you return.

Another way you can help prevent Zika is by remembering that "You" are the first line of defense against mosquitoes and mosquito-borne illnesses. You can do your part to help reduce the mosquito nuisance, by remembering to drain and cover. 

Drain

  • Drain all standing water around the yard.  Mosquitoes need only a surprisingly small amount of water to breed.  Empty cans, buckets, garbage cans, house gutters, flower pots, bromeliads and other plants that hold water, bottles, toys, plastic "kiddie" pools, lids, old tires, pool covers, barrels and any other container or item that holds or can hold water. 
  • If you have a boat, turn it upside down if it's small enough, or cover it if it's too large to turn.  Just make sure the boat cover doesn't also hold water. 
  • If you have a swimming pool, make sure to maintain it properly and run the pump every so often as mosquitoes do not like to breed in moving water. 
  • Twice a week, make sure to empty or rinse out bromeliads and other plants that hold water, pets' water bowls and birdbaths. 

Cover

  • Make sure your doors and windows are covered with screens to keep mosquitoes out of your house.  Protect infants with mosquito netting. 
  • Avoid going outside when mosquitoes are most active, at dawn and dusk.  If you do have to be outside, cover yourself up by wearing loose, light-colored clothing (preferably long pants and long sleeves), shoes and socks.
  • Using EPA-registered insect repellents.  Use a repellent when you go outside.  Follow the directions on the label.  The best repellents use DEET or picaridin as the active ingredient. 

What should I do if I am Pregnant?
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is advising pregnant women not to travel to the Wynwood neighborhood of Miami, where the Florida Department of Health has confirmed there are local transmissions of Zika.  Pregnant women who have traveled to this area on or after June 15 are advised to visit their doctor or health care provider for testing, even if they do not feel sick. This checklist offers some topics and questions you should bring up.

Additional precautions for pregnant women recommended by the CDC and related to the Wynwood neighborhood of Miami include:
  • Pregnant women who live in or travel to the area should be tested for Zika infection in the first and second trimesters of pregnancy, even if they have no symptoms of the virus.
  • Pregnant women and their male and female partners who live in the area should prevent mosquito bites and use proper sexual protection for the length of the pregnancy, or abstain from sex altogether.
  • Male or female partners of pregnant women who have traveled to this area should use safe sex measures for the rest of the pregnancy.
  • Women and men who have traveled to the affected area should wait eight weeks to conceive after their return, while men with symptoms should wait a full six months.

Are neighborhoods in Broward County being sprayed for mosquitos?
Yes. In order to reduce the potential spread of the Zika virus, Broward County's Mosquito Control Section is continuing to limit the mosquito population throughout the county by spraying areas with reported concentrations of mosquitoes, checking known mosquito breeding sites, treating standing water from recent rain events, and spraying in areas requested by citizens. 

Can I request that my neighborhood be sprayed for mosquitos?
Yes. You can contact the Broward County Mosquito Control Section and request spraying in your neighborhood by: 

Is there a Zika Virus Hotline?
Yes.  Operated by the Florida Department of Health, the Zika Virus Information Hotline is 1-855-622-6735.

How can I get daily Zika Virus updates?
In an effort to keep residents and visitors safe and aware about the status of the Zika virus, the Florida Department of Health is issuing updates each weekday at 2:00 p.m. The updates will include a CDC-confirmed Zika case count by county and information to better keep Floridians prepared, educated and informed.

REFERENCE MATERIALS

MOSQUITO BITE PROTECTION FLYERS
Mosquito Bite Protection flyer in English pdf
Prevención de Picaduras de Mosquitos en Florida (Spanish) pdf
Pwoteksyon pou Moustik Pa Mòde Moun nan Florida (Creole) pdf
Prevenção da picada do mosquito na Flórida (Portuguese) pdf

PROTECT YOUR PREGNANCY FLYERS
Protect Your Pregnancy flyer in English pdf
Proteja su embarazote (Spanish) pdf
Pwoteje gwosès ou (Creole) pdf
Proteja-se durante sua gravidez (Portuguese) pdf

IMPORTANT LINKS FOR MORE INFORMATION:
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Florida Department of Health
Pregnant Women: How to Protect Yourself
Zika Resources and Publications
Build a Zika Prevention Kit
Prevent Mosquito Bites
Zika Communication Toolkits
Zika Video Resources
Zika Print Resources
Zika Infographics

zika virus

zika virus

Portions of Three Municipalities in Broward to be Sprayed Thursday for Mosquito Larvae
Portions of Three Municipalities in Broward to be Sprayed Thursday for Mosquito Larvae
Portions of Three Municipalities in Broward to be Sprayed Thursday for Mosquito Larvae
Portions of Three Municipalities in Broward to be Sprayed Thursday for Mosquito Larvae